Tax Policy; Harvard Law School Summit

Practical and Practice issues for Professionals who practice in the area of taxation. Moral, social and economic issues relating to taxes, including international issues, the U.S. Internal Revenue Code, state tax issues, etc. Not for "tax protestor" issues, which should be posted in the "tax protestor" forum above. The advice or opinion given herein should not be relied on for any purpose whatsoever. Also examines cookie-cutter deals that have no economic substance but exist only to generate losses, as marketed by everybody from solo practitioner tax lawyers to the major accounting firms.
User avatar
Number Six
Hereditary Margrave of Mooloosia
Posts: 1107
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2008 7:35 pm
Location: Connecticut, "The Constitution State"

Tax Policy; Harvard Law School Summit

Postby Number Six » Sun Nov 03, 2013 1:17 am

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_9Rk4CtqC4

David Cay Johnston and others give presentations here with historical retrospectives, he goes back to the "Code of Hammurabi" ancient Athens, etc. and is quite critical about current US tax policy and how universities teach taxes.
'There are two kinds of injustice: the first is found in those who do an injury, the second in those who fail to protect another from injury when they can.' (Roman. Cicero, De Off. I. vii)

'Choose loss rather than shameful gains.' (Chilon Fr. 10. Diels)

User avatar
Duke2Earl
Eighth Operator of the Delusional Mooloo
Posts: 589
Joined: Fri May 16, 2003 11:09 pm
Location: Neverland

Re: Tax Policy; Harvard Law School Summit

Postby Duke2Earl » Mon Nov 04, 2013 3:35 pm

Actually, if you are even partly sane, it is very hard not to be extremely critical about current US tax policy. However, the fact that tax policy and the current tax law is at best, stupid, does not mean that individuals are not required to pay taxes.
My choice early in life was to either be a piano player in a whorehouse or a politican. And to tell the truth there's hardly any difference.

Harry S Truman

User avatar
Number Six
Hereditary Margrave of Mooloosia
Posts: 1107
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2008 7:35 pm
Location: Connecticut, "The Constitution State"

Re: Tax Policy; Harvard Law School Summit

Postby Number Six » Tue Nov 05, 2013 2:43 pm

If you are partly moral as a citizen, as defined by traditional standards of what is moral, you have regularly contacted your representatives as well as doing other legal and productive things to advance a more healthy tax system.
'There are two kinds of injustice: the first is found in those who do an injury, the second in those who fail to protect another from injury when they can.' (Roman. Cicero, De Off. I. vii)

'Choose loss rather than shameful gains.' (Chilon Fr. 10. Diels)

User avatar
Duke2Earl
Eighth Operator of the Delusional Mooloo
Posts: 589
Joined: Fri May 16, 2003 11:09 pm
Location: Neverland

Re: Tax Policy; Harvard Law School Summit

Postby Duke2Earl » Wed Nov 06, 2013 4:59 pm

I don't necessarily believe that "moral" has anything to do with it. I was advocating a system that is at least reasonably rational. During my working life (I am now retired) I often spoke out for a more rational system. I did so in writing to elected representatives. I wrote and published several articles. I gave a number of speeches and presentations on the subject and served on several committees of the relevant associations. I got exactly nowhere. And I expect no better in the future. In a world where money equals speech and legislators spend far more of their efforts raising funds than on actual legislative activities, I doubt there can be any other result.

And what would a more rational system look like? To me, it would eliminate or vastly reduce social engineering. It would stop favoring certain income producing activities over others. A system that stops trying to either encourage or discourage basically any types of income or activities. As Warren Buffet might say, I want a system where hedge fund managers pay the same tax rates as their secretaries... a system where international businesses cannot shelter hundreds of billions of dollars in untaxed profits by playing international shell games. In other words, a more rational system would simply raise the funds necessary to run the government in the simplest, most efficient fashion. And before I am misinterpreted, I do not favor a flat tax, a "Fair" tax, a sales tax or a VAT tax. But a simplified, more rational income tax would vastly reduce the compliance burden on both businesses and individuals. But that would, as most big changes, produce both winners and losers, and in this case the losers would mostly be those with the most money, who would be forced for a change to actually pay up. Never going to happen.
Last edited by Duke2Earl on Thu Nov 14, 2013 5:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: misspelling corrected
My choice early in life was to either be a piano player in a whorehouse or a politican. And to tell the truth there's hardly any difference.



Harry S Truman


Return to “Tax Practice & Policy and Tax Shelters”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest