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Adya Water

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2013 2:31 pm
by Number Six
I received an email with this presentation from a distributor from California on the health benefits of Adya water: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=scjr2KZwKxM

"Watch this interview with Dr. Brian Clement from Hippocrates Health Institute and Matt Bakos (President of Adya Inc.) discussing how important Adya Clarity is for our water and our health in this toxic age in which we live. In this interview, Dr. Clement shares his scientific findings with Adya Clarity, debunks the misinformation, and talks about the future implications of this incredible technology. If you have any additional questions regarding this video or about any of the Adya products, we are here to educate and assist you in your journey with this life changing water. http://www.micawaters.com"

This bogus product has been properly debunked on principle by the health community already:

http://www.naturalnews.com/034051_Adya_ ... foods.html

Re: Adya Water

Posted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 3:28 am
by fortinbras
I have not been able to find out much about Brian Clement or Adya Water.
Clement runs a vegan spa near Hollywood, Fla. I have no clue what his training was - he puts a "Dr." in front of his name and a "Ph.D." behind it, simultaneously, which is a bit declassè. Considering his own story is that he was suddenly converted to the wisdom of raw food regimen and has been involved with the spa ever since, I suspect his education was either not in the field of health or nutrition or else not in a classroom.

As for the water, it appears to be overpriced processed water, not significantly different from tap water except for the brutal price tag. And it boasts micro-nutrients. You can get the same benefits much more affordably with CVA or Rite-Aid brand multi-mineral tablets - washed down with tap water. Legally, Adya Water cannot make any health claims whatever.

Re: Adya Water

Posted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 4:17 am
by notorial dissent
fortinbras wrote: I suspect his education was either not in the field of health or nutrition or else not in a classroom.
I'm betting one of those handy dandy diploma mills that'll give you PhD for the right price no questions asked, or else he just manufactured it, rather like he does his miracle water.
As for the water, it appears to be overpriced processed water, not significantly different from tap water except for the brutal price tag. For some silly reason, I really have a problem with a mineral supplement being added to water that is basically black mica that has been dissolved in sulphuric acid, particularly considering what the mica breaks down in to when disolved. There are just so many things wrong with that on a visceral level I don't know where to start. I can't for the life of me see any possible health benefit to this. If nothing else, some one with a pretend degree, peddling what is supposed to be a "natural" cure for something that is strictly a chemically manufactured product just screams scam to me. And, at $150 a bottle, this stuff ain't cheap.And it boasts micro-nutrients. You can get the same benefits muchly more affordably with CVA or Rite-Aid brand multi-mineral tablets - washed down with tap water. Legally, Adya Water cannot make any health claims whatever.

Re: Adya Water

Posted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 7:14 am
by Gregg
And, at $150 a bottle,


WTF???

I can get Absinthe for that kind of money.

Re: Adya Water

Posted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 7:20 am
by notorial dissent
And all things considered, would be much better for you, and has the added value of being truly organic, or at least the real stuff would be.

Re: Adya Water

Posted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 4:34 pm
by Quixote
This bogus product has been properly debunked on principle by the health community already:

http://www.naturalnews.com/034051_Adya_ ... foods.html


That article does not debunk the health claims for Adya Clarity. It merely points out that the unsupported claims for Adya Clarity conflict with the unsupported claims of the raw food community. According to someone calling himself Orac (see http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2011/ ... ack-of-co/), the author, Mike Adams, never met a quack remedy he didn't like until he encountered Adya Clarity.

Re: Adya Water

Posted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 6:25 pm
by fortinbras
I haven't found any references to Adya Water - other than that "natural news" article and lots of paid promos - not even a court case. I suspect the dearth of newspaper comment is not that it's unassailable (it would then get some positive coverage) but that it's so obscure that hardly anyone associated with any media has heard of it. And at $150 a bottle, it will probably stay that way.

Yes, absinthe is expensive ... it is technically spirits, not liquor, meaning that it has no sugar content. Taken straight from the bottle it could probably cause serious damage, one reason for its reputation. Absinthe lushes traditionally thin out this lighter fluid by posting a sort of grate over the rim of the glass (an absinthe spoon), put a cube or two of sugar on it and then pour water onto the sugar cube to make it dissolve and thereby sweeten and dilute the absinthe. Even so it's got a kick ... there's a reason absinthe is called Green Fairy.

Re: Adya Water

Posted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 3:58 am
by Number Six
Quixote wrote:
This bogus product has been properly debunked on principle by the health community already:

http://www.naturalnews.com/034051_Adya_ ... foods.html


That article does not debunk the health claims for Adya Clarity. It merely points out that the unsupported claims for Adya Clarity conflict with the unsupported claims of the raw food community. According to someone calling himself Orac (see http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2011/ ... ack-of-co/), the author, Mike Adams, never met a quack remedy he didn't like until he encountered Adya Clarity.


Good research. There was also this thread from a "health" site that raised questions from some posters, though it looks like members were cautious to be critical: http://immortalhair.forumandco.com/t569 ... invaluable

Re: Adya Water

Posted: Wed Feb 05, 2014 8:30 pm
by Number Six
The Adya water people went on the offensive claiming that a recent set of clinical trials disproved "the smear campaign" by those in the alternative health field:

http://www.kacperpostawski.com/440/adya ... t-30-days/

As usual the sales promotion of products like this tries to create anxiety in people that they are being bombarded by toxins in their environment or diets and then offer a solution. More bunk.