FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

"Buy 1 for yourself and get the chance to sell your friends and family 5 and get your downline started!" We examine the multi-level marketing industry, where only the people who come up with the ideas make any money, and everybody else is left unhappy, broke, and tired of reading scripts and selling overpriced vitamins and similarly worthless products. Includes Global Prosperity, Pinnacle Quest International, IRS Codebusters, Stratia, and other new Global Prosperity scams.

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Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby wserra » Fri May 21, 2010 3:00 pm

FHTM wrote:You should get your facts straight before posting them online.


My facts are straight. If you like the idea of being taunted a second time, I'd be glad to accomodate you.

FHTM just had the case against Fortune Social and Isaacs removed from Federal Court.


True but deceptive. You tried to get the case against you dismissed from a USDC in KY due to lack of personal jurisdiction. On May 10, 2010, Judge Forester denied your motion. The hearing on FHTM's motion for a preliminary injunction had been adjourned at your request until the next day, May 11. On May 11, the hearing was again continued, until May 18, to take up the issue of arbitration. On May 17, Judge Forester granted the motion to arbitrate the dispute, but directed that FHTM's motion for a preliminary injunction was properly before him, and noted that the hearing on that motion would proceed as scheduled the following day. Before the hearing, you guys basically gave up, and agreed to immediately take down your websites and cease infringing on FHTM's trademarks.

So yes, the case is now "removed from Federal Court", but with an order that you knock the shit off. Congratulations.

BTW, isn't "FHTM" a trademark? Aren't you infringing by using it here, thus violating the order? If I weren't the nice guy I am, I might report that to FHTM's attorney, one Brian M. Johnson, of Greenebaum Doll & McDonald in Lexington at (859) 231-8500, email available in the order linked above. But I don't take sides between scammers.

Fortune was not able to get an injunction regarding their bogus claims against Isaacs.


Right. It was mooted by you agreeing to it. What do you call the order if not an injunction?

Why are you bashing the guy who seeks to tell everyone the real truth.


Because "the guy who seeks to tell everyone the real truth" first tried to scam people by recruiting them into FHTM, then tried to scam FHTM distributors by "helping" to build their pyramid, and when those didn't work tried to scam people who were already victims with "tools so you can help yourself out of this bind".

Clear now?
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Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby Arthur Rubin » Sat May 22, 2010 9:34 pm

wserra wrote:
FHTM wrote:
BTW, isn't "FHTM" a trademark? Aren't you infringing by using it here, thus violating the order?
I am not a lawyer, and you are, but I would have thought that using FHTM in the text, to refer to that organization, would be allowed, in spite of the court order, under the 1st Amendment protecting speech. On the other hand, if it's one of the defendants posting under the handle "FHTM", that would be different.
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Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby wserra » Sat May 22, 2010 9:47 pm

Arthur Rubin wrote:I would have thought that using FHTM in the text, to refer to that organization, would be allowed, in spite of the court order, under the 1st Amendment protecting speech.


For you or me, absolutely.

On the other hand, if it's one of the defendants posting under the handle "FHTM", that would be different.


And the thread makes it virtually certain that it is. Look back to where "FHTM" directs marks to the (now defunct) "Fortune Social" site.
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FHTM

Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby FHTM » Sat Jun 19, 2010 12:58 pm

wserra wrote:No, don't do that.

If FHTM has scammed anyone reading this, by all means report it to law enforcement. The consumer protection bureau of a state AG's office is a good place to start. But don't report it to "fortunesocial.com" so that they can "reply with the tools". They'll reply, all right, but with stuff designed to separate you from even more of your money.

Take a look at this. Three months ago, these same guys (that's "fortunesocial.com", Google) went trolling for FHTM participants:
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PR Log (Press Release) – Feb 01, 2010 – Tampa, Florida (Feb 1, 2010) – Just two months after launching the first private social network (http://www.fortunesocial.com), designed specifically for a network marketing company, Fortune Social goes live with its web meeting module. FHTM Webconnect® is dedicated to helping FHTM representatives build successful teams globally. FHTM Webconnect continues to define the category of Web-based collaboration (http://www.fhtmwebconnect.com) by adding a suite of interactive services to its meeting and training site. The company today announced the immediate availability of Webconnect personalized offices that Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing representatives can use for private multi-user meetings with up to 500 attendees simultaneously.
So just three months ago, fortunesocial wanted FHTM participants to pay them to help build the pyramid.

It's classic scammer behavior: if the original scam fails, try to set yourself up to scam victims of the original scam. If I have some time this weekend, I think "Fortune Social" bears some more scrutiny.



Fortune social was a social network like Facebook for all MLM companies. It operated as a free service for anyone in MLM to use. Fortunesocial never built a pyramid nor acted anything like one. It however, developed a toolset beneficial to network marketers in 2005. Get your facts straight before you bash the messenger. FHTM is a scam and an endless recruiting pyramid scheme which is why fortunesocial dissassociated with them in April of 2010.

FHTM

Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby FHTM » Sat Jun 19, 2010 1:01 pm

wserra wrote:
Arthur Rubin wrote:I would have thought that using FHTM in the text, to refer to that organization, would be allowed, in spite of the court order, under the 1st Amendment protecting speech.


For you or me, absolutely.

On the other hand, if it's one of the defendants posting under the handle "FHTM", that would be different.


And the thread makes it virtually certain that it is. Look back to where "FHTM" directs marks to the (now defunct) "Fortune Social" site.


What court order prevents people from using the words FHTM in an online post? What court order prevents people from the telling the truth about an organization. The 1st amendment allows freedom of speech. There is no court in the land that has issued a gag order on the fortunesocial team. Once again, BS from Orberson and spreading false rumors.

FHTM

Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby FHTM » Sat Jun 19, 2010 1:09 pm

Elmware wrote:I have a friend who is into these stupid MLMs. She used to be in Skynary or SkyBiz or whatever you call it but then it went under. Now she's trying to convince me to join this FHTM thing and I keep telling her that I want nothing to do with it. She even had me go to one of their online presentation thing at http://www.fht.com.

The whole thing reiks of pyramids!


"BEWARE BEWARE" FHTM is an endless recruiting pyramid scheme as defined by n of the Montana and other State & Federal agencies". The other problem is when you speak out about their illegal ways you need to be prepared to get hit with frivolous lawsuits, like Isaacs and fortunesocial.

Isaacs is fighting back with a lawsuit of his own against Fortune and Orberson (personally) for violation of dozens of laws including Federal RICO statutes, mail and wire fraud.

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Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby wserra » Sat Jun 19, 2010 5:23 pm

FHTM wrote:Fortune social was a social network like Facebook for all MLM companies.


I'm sure you would have liked it to be. However, both the press release you quoted in your post and the name you chose for your company indicate that you targeted FHTM participants.

Fortunesocial never built a pyramid nor acted anything like one.


Never said it did. You were more than willing, however, to sell the marks the stones.

It however, developed a toolset beneficial to network marketers in 2005.


AKA "the stones". BTW, the "tools" scam is just as much a scam as the original pyramid. Maybe more. "Tools" don't help that much in building a house of cards, regardless of what the sellers claim.

Get your facts straight before you bash the messenger.


Oh, as before, they're pretty straight.

FHTM is a scam and an endless recruiting pyramid scheme which is why fortunesocial dissassociated with them in April of 2010.


I think the fact that they successfully sued you is worth mentioning. And the fact that there is a pending motion to hold you in contempt for violating the injunction.
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Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby wserra » Sat Jun 19, 2010 6:07 pm

FHTM wrote:What court order prevents people from using the words FHTM in an online post?


People generally? None. You? How about this one: "Defendants will take the following actions: . . . (ii) immediately cease and desist using the trademarks identified in Exhibits A and B to Fortune’s Motion for Preliminary Injunction". "FHTM" is identified in such exhibit. Moreover, it is not just the logo; FHTM has a word mark on "FHTM" as well.

What court order prevents people from the telling the truth about an organization.


None. The law prevents trademark infringements generally though, and in your case an order enjoins infringements specifically.

The 1st amendment allows freedom of speech.


It certainly does. Freedom of speech, however, does not include commercial use of someone else's trademark.
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Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby wserra » Sat Jun 19, 2010 6:11 pm

FHTM wrote:The other problem is when you speak out about their illegal ways you need to be prepared to get hit with frivolous lawsuits, like Isaacs and fortunesocial.


"Frivolous"? Shocking. So why'd you consent to their injunction?
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FHTM

Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby FHTM » Mon Jun 21, 2010 12:15 pm

wserra wrote:
FHTM wrote:You should get your facts straight before posting them online.


My facts are straight. If you like the idea of being taunted a second time, I'd be glad to accomodate you.

FHTM just had the case against Fortune Social and Isaacs removed from Federal Court.


True but deceptive. You tried to get the case against you dismissed from a USDC in KY due to lack of personal jurisdiction. On May 10, 2010, Judge Forester denied your motion. The hearing on FHTM's motion for a preliminary injunction had been adjourned at your request until the next day, May 11. On May 11, the hearing was again continued, until May 18, to take up the issue of arbitration. On May 17, Judge Forester granted the motion to arbitrate the dispute, but directed that FHTM's motion for a preliminary injunction was properly before him, and noted that the hearing on that motion would proceed as scheduled the following day. Before the hearing, you guys basically gave up, and agreed to immediately take down your websites and cease infringing on FHTM's trademarks.

So yes, the case is now "removed from Federal Court", but with an order that you knock the sh*t off. Congratulations.

BTW, isn't "FHTM" a trademark? Aren't you infringing by using it here, thus violating the order? If I weren't the nice guy I am, I might report that to FHTM's attorney, one Brian M. Johnson, of Greenebaum Doll & McDonald in Lexington at (859) 231-8500, email available in the order linked above. But I don't take sides between scammers.

Fortune was not able to get an injunction regarding their bogus claims against Isaacs.


Right. It was mooted by you agreeing to it. What do you call the order if not an injunction?

Why are you bashing the guy who seeks to tell everyone the real truth.


Because "the guy who seeks to tell everyone the real truth" first tried to scam people by recruiting them into FHTM, then tried to scam FHTM distributors by "helping" to build their pyramid, and when those didn't work tried to scam people who were already victims with "tools so you can help yourself out of this bind".

Clear now?



Actually you have no clue. I am glad you can read parts of the KY case but you have no idea what is behind it or why things are happening.

Isaacs never tried to deceive anyone. He was an FHTM rep until he realized that FHTM is a deceitful fraud and was hurting tens of thousands of people. Because his morality is far superior to Paul Orberson he felt his obligation to the human race was to let them know of the train wreck their lives :brickwall: :brickwall: were about to encounter as being affiliated with FHTM. As far as the webinar system - it was developed back in 2005 and was a subscription based program that you could use or not. Nobody tricked anyone into using it.

Whistleblower fights back after frivolous suit by FHTM for exposing their ILLEGAL Pyramid Scheme

Lexington, Kentucky - June 16, 2010 - In light of all of the recent investments scams including the infamous Bernie Maddoff, whistleblowers and those with morals fear that the frauds they expose will result in unjust lawsuits filed against them by the companies they complain about. One such situation was that of the lawsuit filed by Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing against Fortune Social LLC and Joseph Isaacs in May 2010.

Joseph Isaacs and Fortune Social, LLC (collectively “Isaacs”) deny each and every claim brought by Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing, Inc. (“FHTM”) in a filing made today with the American Arbitration Association, who is overseeing this case. In addition, Isaacs fights back and asserts his own counterclaim for relief against FHTM, Paul C. Orberson (individually and in his capacity as President of FHTM), Jeff Orberson (individually and in his capacity as Chief Operating Officer of FHTM), and Thomas A. Mills (individually and in his capacity as Vice-President and Chief Executive Officer of FHTM) (collectively “FHTM”). Isaacs counterclaim claim Breach of Fiduciary Duty, Breach of Contract, Common Law Fraud, Unfair & Deceptive Business Practices, Failure to Register Securities, Fraudulent Practices Regarding the Sale of Securities, Civil Racketeering Conspiracy (violation of the Federal RICO statutes) and Defamation.

FHTM operates an unlawful product-based endless recruiting pyramid scheme that relies on untrue and misleading representations and unlawful, unfair, and fraudulent business practices. While FHTM purports to be in the business of selling name-brand services like wireless, satellite television, home security, vitamins, nutritional products and travel services, its true business is using consumers to generate fee income for representing non-existent partnerships, major sports figures, and prominent businessmen. To entice consumers to participate, FHTM makes untrue or misleading claims regarding its relationship with Fortune 100 companies like Verizon Wireless, GE Security, Dish Networks and Travelocity to create the illusion that consumers can become millionaires in three to five years.

FHTM’s growth exploded when it began to lure consumers disenchanted with traditional jobs and the recession that began in 2007 to inspirational and high-pressure business opportunity seminars touting an innovative business model that promises huge financial rewards through multi-level network marketing. FHTM erring presenters claim to have proprietary tools, special relationships, and other support that allow consumers to grow their own business by partnering with FHTM’s “companies”.

It would not be long before Isaacs (and the world) made several troubling discoveries about FHTM’s business plan and practices that doused his enthusiasm: (1) Paul Orberson had not made any special arrangements with the companies mentioned at the business opportunity/presentation seminar or in the company produced videos; (2) the only way to earn a significant income and be promoted up the ranks was to recruit additional IRs; (3) FHTM had not received regulatory approval for its pyramiding scheme in every state; (4) only a handful of IRs had earned anywhere near the residuals projected; (5) the prominent businessmen, politicians, former attorney generals and sports figures to whom FHTM constantly alluded were in fact IRs actively promoting their own FHTM business; and (6) a growing number of state attorneys general had already begun investigating FHTM in response to numerous complaints.

It turns out that FHTM’s ‘innovative’ marketing plan is nothing more than a face lift to an age-old scheme. According to the FTC’s Consumer Protection Bureau:

Pyramid schemes now come in so many forms that they may be difficult to recognize immediately. However, they all share one overriding characteristic. They promise consumers or investors large profits based primarily on recruiting others to join their program, not based on profits from any real investment or real sale of goods to the public. Some schemes may purport to sell a product, but they often simply use the product to hide their pyramid structure. There are two tell-tale signs that a product is simply being used to disguise a pyramid scheme: inventory loading and a lack of retail sales. Inventory loading occurs when a company's incentive program forces recruits to buy more products than they could ever sell, often at inflated prices. If this occurs throughout the company's distribution system, the people at the top of the pyramid reap substantial profits, even though little or no product moves to market. The people at the bottom make excessive payments for inventory that simply accumulates in their basements. A lack of retail sales is also a red flag that a pyramid exists. Many pyramid schemes will claim that their product is selling like hot cakes. However, on closer examination, the sales occur only between people inside the pyramid structure or to new recruits joining the structure, not to consumers out in the general public.

Nonetheless, the truth is catching up with FHTM. On December 10, 2009, The North Dakota Attorney General's Office filed a Cease and Desist Order for violation of the Consumer Fraud Law, the Transient Merchant Law, the Home Solicitation Sales Law, and the North Dakota Pyramid Schemes Act. On January 19, 2010, FHTM entered into a Assurance of Voluntary Compliance with the North Dakota Attorney General's Office. On March 16, 2010, the Montana State Auditor's Office filed a Temporary Cease and Desist Order against FHTM, Paul C. Orberson, Thomas A. Mills, and Dianne Graber (a Montana IR). According to the Montana State Auditor's Office, FHTM has engaged in acts or practices constituting violations of the Securities Act of Montana, Montana Code ANN.30-10-101 et seq. On April 22, 2010, FHTM agreed to pay nearly $1 million and to change its business practices to resolve the charge that it is operating a pyramid promotional scheme.

With each passing day, more states are jumping on FHTM’s bandwagon. The alarming rise in consumer complaints and governmental sanctions has prompted the Better Business Bureau of Central and Eastern Kentucky to downgrade FHTM’s rating from “B-” to “F”. At the same time, a proliferation of online bulletin boards and blogs, such as http://www.complaintsboard.com and http://www.scams.com criticize FHTM’s pyramid scheme confirms that Isaacs’ experience is not unique. Will those operations be the next target of Fortune’s high price legal team?

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Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby wserra » Mon Jun 21, 2010 2:39 pm

FHTM wrote:Isaacs never tried to deceive anyone. He was an FHTM rep until he realized that FHTM is a deceitful fraud and was hurting tens of thousands of people.


That's not the way FHTM tells it:
The Real FHTM (also scammers) wrote:Isaacs is a former IR who was terminated after he refused to cease using Fortune’s trademarks and trade names on the website http://www.fortunesocial.com, which appears to be owned by and operated through FS. The original intent of http://www.fortunesocial.com was to promote Defendants’ networking seminars, online web-meeting products and other services and products. Defendants promoted their products and services by, inter alia, using Fortune’s trademarks and tradename to lure IRs and consumers to their websites. After Fortune requested that Isaacs cease and desist improperly using Fortune’s marks and tradename, Isaacs only responded by offering to sell http://www.fortunesocial.com to Fortune for $2.5 million. When Fortune refused this offer (at least in part because Fortune would be effectively purchasing its own marks and tradenames from Defendants, who had no right to use them), Isaacs responded by filing a complaint with the Lexington, Kentucky, Better Business Bureau that contained numerous false statements. It was at this time that Fortune terminated Isaacs as an IR.
Who's telling the truth? I don't know. Choose Tweedlescam or Tweedlescum. And why do you talk about yourself in the third person?

FHTM wrote:Because his morality is far superior to Paul Orberson he felt his obligation to the human race was to let them know of the train wreck their lives were about to encounter as being affiliated with FHTM.


Izzat so? Well, as we've seen in this very thread, first you were an FHTM distributor. Next you tried to piggyback your scam on their scam, infringing as you go:
FHTM Webconnect® is dedicated to helping FHTM representatives build successful teams globally.... The company today announced the immediate availability of Webconnect personalized offices that Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing representatives can use for private multi-user meetings with up to 500 attendees simultaneously.
Emphasis supplied. Shame on you for promoting a "train wreck". Finally, you tried to scam the FHTM victims by selling them "tools" - when the only "tool" they needed was the telephone to call law enforcement.

Nice "morality".

Whistleblower fights back after frivolous suit by FHTM for exposing their ILLEGAL Pyramid Scheme blah, blah, blah.


How many places are you going to spam with that screed? At least three already, right? And you fancy yourself a "whistleblower"? Sin vergüenza, Joe.

And let's not forget that you agreed to stop infringing and pull down your own websites.
"A wise man proportions belief to the evidence."
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Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby littleroundman » Mon Jun 21, 2010 5:01 pm

FHTM wrote:Whistleblower fights back after frivolous suit by FHTM for exposing their ILLEGAL Pyramid Scheme


Err,

that wouldn't be the headline from a self published release which appeared on free press release.com and multiple other free "news" sites cleverly disguised as a newspaper extract, would it ???

FHTM

Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby FHTM » Fri Jul 02, 2010 11:15 am

Whistleblower fights back ...

[Moderator snips identical screed to the one Joe posted here two weeks ago. That's verbatim.]

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Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby wserra » Fri Jul 02, 2010 1:02 pm

You're spamming this self-published "press release" all over the place, aren't you, Joe?

If this is so obvious, and you're a "whistleblower" and all, why - in court, where it counts - did you agree to pull down your websites and stop infringing?
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Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby Thule » Sat Jul 03, 2010 2:35 pm

*Cue Quatloos Symphony no 8 for Crickets and Rustling Leaves.
Survivor of the Dark Agenda Whistleblower Award, August 2012.

FHTM

Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby FHTM » Fri Jul 30, 2010 2:27 pm

Joseph Isaacs and Fortune Social, LLC (collectively “Isaacs”) deny each and every claim

Blah, blah, blah. Moderator snips verbatim repost of screed Isaacs has now posted here three times.

bmielke

Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby bmielke » Fri Jul 30, 2010 2:50 pm

CLEAN UP ON AISLE 2! CLEAN UP ON AISLE 2! :evil:

Um I am not sure if you know this or not Mr. FHTM but you already spammed this board a couple of times.

Maybe you could find a new place.

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Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby wserra » Fri Jul 30, 2010 6:35 pm

You actually have to give Isaacs credit for realizing that, when he tries to engage Q! with something other than canned BS - when he tries to be original - he gets his ass handed to him in thin slices. Best to stick to being non-responsive.

But tell me, Joe, if this is all so obvious, and you're a "whistleblower" and all, why - in court, where it counts - did you agree to pull down your websites and stop infringing?
"A wise man proportions belief to the evidence."
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FHTM

Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby FHTM » Thu Sep 23, 2010 7:30 pm

A class action lawsuit was filed against Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing (FHTM), its officers, directors, Presidential Ambassadors and all National Sales Managers claiming fraud, pyramid scheme and RICO violations in the Eastern District of the Federal Courts on September 2, 2010

Defendants listed in the lawsuit include:
Paul C. Orberson, Jeff Orberson, Thomas A. Mills, David Mills, Billy Stahl, Simon Davies, Ruel Morton, Todd Rowland, Ashley Rowland, Todd & Ashley, Inc., Mike Misenheimer, Steve Jordan, Joel McNinch, Chris Doyle, Ken Brown, Jerry Brown, Bob Decant, Joanne McMahon, Terry Walker, Sandi Walker, Sherri Winter, Trey Knight, Kevin Mullins, Scott Aguilar, Molly Aguilar, Nathan Kirby, Dwayne Brown, Aaron Decker, Susan Frank, Ramiro Armenta, Angelina Armenta, Alexis Adame, Teresa Adame, Darla DiGrandi, Matt Morse, Matt Barrett and Roberto Rivera


This is an action by plaintiffs on behalf of themselves and those similarly situated to recover damages caused by the defendants' operation of an inherently fraudulent pyramid scheme. The pyramid scheme is fraudulent because it requires the payment by participants of money to defendant Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing, Inc. ("Fortune"), in return for which participants receive (1) the right to sell products and (2) the right to receive in return for recruiting other participants into the program rewards which are unrelated to sale of the product to ultimate users.

This action is brought on behalf of a national class of persons who serve or have served as independent representatives for Fortune, pursuant to the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, 18 U.S.C. § 1961-1968 ("RICO"), the Kentucky Consumer Protection Act, KRS Chapter 367, and the laws of Kentucky.

Under the Compensation Plan utilized by Fortune until at least July 1, 2010, IRs are able to earn compensation from two sources: (1) bonuses for recruiting and sponsoring new representatives; and (2) commissions from sales of products and services by themselves and by recruits in their "downline.

Fortune operates as an illegal pyramid scheme because this compensation plan affords IRs the right to receive in return for recruiting other participants into Fortune rewards which are unrelated to the sale of products or services to ultimate users outside of Fortune. Fortune's compensation plan involves an elaborate set of bonuses which are effectively the only way to earn money in Fortune and which are all tied not to real sales to outside customers, but rather to recruitment of new IRs.

To perpetuate the fraudulent pyramid scheme described above, Fortune claims to have special relationships with or to be a "partner" of several large major national companies whose products and services Fortune offers. These companies include, but are not limited to, AT&T, Verizon Wireless, Sprint, Dish Networks, General Electric Security ("GE Security"), DuPont and Home Depot. Fortune has used the trademarks of these and other companies in marketing materials and business presentations in order to convince prospective customers that Fortune is a legal business. In reality, Fortune does not have any sort of special relationship with these companies. Fortune is not a "partner" with Dish Networks. Rather it is a third-party independent contractor authorized to sell Dish Networks service. There are numerous other such third-party vendors of Dish Network.

All of the defendants in this action collectively form an "enterprise" under RICO, 18 U.S.C. § 1962, in that they are a group of individuals and entities associated in fact, although not a legal entity.

The defendants' promotion of an illegal pyramid scheme is a per se scheme to defraud under the mail and wire fraud statutes; thus, the defendants have committed racketeering acts by promoting an illegal pyramid scheme by using and causing others to use the mail and by transmitting and causing others to transmit, by means of wire in interstate commerce, writing, signs, signals, pictures and sounds, all in furtherance of and for purposes of executing a scheme or artifice to defraud, namely an illegal pyramid scheme.

FHTM

Re: FHTM (Fortune High Tech Marketing)

Postby FHTM » Thu Sep 23, 2010 7:33 pm

wserra wrote:You actually have to give Isaacs credit for realizing that, when he tries to engage Q! with something other than canned BS - when he tries to be original - he gets his ass handed to him in thin slices. Best to stick to being non-responsive.

But tell me, Joe, if this is all so obvious, and you're a "whistleblower" and all, why - in court, where it counts - did you agree to pull down your websites and stop infringing?


It's a David and Golliath deal. To save me tens of thousands in extra legal costs I agreed to temporarily take down the website - nothing more. I never agreed to any infringement. You should get your story straight. You blow alot of smoke......cant wait to hear your take on the class action I had nothing to do with


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